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Jose Antonio Suarez
Jose Antonio Suarez
Background information
Occupation Laundry worker
Born ca. 1944
Puerto Rico
Spouse(s) Maria Rivera Torres
Attack information
Date April 1966
Location(s) New York City, United States
Target(s) Family
Killed 6
Weapon(s) Knife

Jose Antonio Suarez (also known as Jose Torres) was a Puerto Rican laundry worker who killed his common-law wife and five children in New York City, United States in April 1966. He was afterwards arrested and confessed to the murders, though he later plead not guilty and eventually had to be set free, because he had not been informed of his rights and police was unsuccessful to obtain any further evidence against him.

[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8]

[9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39]

VictimsEdit

  • Maria Rivera Torres, 23, his common-law wife
  • Harry Rivera, 5, his stepson
  • Yvette Suarez, 4, his daughter
  • Maria Antoinette Suarez, 3, his daughter
  • Nancy Suarez, 2, his daughter
  • Jose Suarez Jr., 1, his son

ReferencesEdit

  1. Suspect in slayings to get mental test, The New York Times (April 29, 1966)
  2. Wife, 5 children killed, ex-mental patient held, Schenectady Gazette (April 29, 1966)
  3. Admitted slayer freed on high court ruling, The Owosso Argus-Press (February 21, 1967)
  4. Confessed killer of 6 set free, The Pittsburgh Press (February 21, 1967)
  5. Confessed slayer freed, Spokane Daily Chronicle (February 21, 1967)
  6. Confessed killer of six goes free, The New York Times (February 21, 1967)
  7. A mother and her five young children..., The New York Times (April 28, 1966)
  8. The Law; How to Make Sure A Confession Stands Up, The New York Times (February 26, 1967)
  9. Confessed slayer of six goes free, The New York Times (February 21, 1967)
  10. A mother and her five young children, The New York Times (April 28, 1966)
  11. How to Make Sure A Confession Stands Up, The New York Times (February 26, 1967)
  12. Man is charged in six deaths, Reading Eagle (April 28, 1966)
  13. Mother, 5 tots are victims of stabbings, The Morning Record (April 28, 1966)
  14. Factory worker who said he killed wife and five children freed by court, The Gettysburg Times (February 21, 1967)
  15. Admitted slayer of wife and five children freed, Park City Daily News (February 21, 1967)
  16. Self-admitted killer of six gains release, The Tuscaloosa News (February 21, 1967)
  17. Technicality frees killer of six, Ocala Star-Banner (February 21, 1967)
  18. Admitted slayer is freed, Lewiston Evening Journal (February 21, 1967)
  19. National dilemma: Is the criminal being over-protected?, The Day (March 20, 1967)
  20. Court rulings prompt change, The Norwalk Hour (March 20, 1967)
  21. [1], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  22. [2], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  23. [3], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  24. [4], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  25. [5], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  26. [6], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  27. [7], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  28. [8], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  29. [9], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  30. [10], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  31. [11], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  32. [12], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  33. [13], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  34. [], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  35. [], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  36. [], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  37. [], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  38. [], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
  39. [], [[Wikipedia:|]] ()
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